Fall 18’ @ THe School for Poetic Computation


POETECHS LOGO.gif

 

CREATIVE CoDE Wordplay

 I drew “Veto” and “Vote” with coded lines. Lines are what define our political system; lines between red and blue, conservative and liberal, vote and veto.

I drew “Veto” and “Vote” with coded lines. Lines are what define our political system; lines between red and blue, conservative and liberal, vote and veto.

Screen Shot 2018-10-15 at 2.34.40 PM.png
 Words are slippery. “EVER” can become “NEVER” with little effort in a line of poetry or code. Meaning is so easy to alter.

Words are slippery. “EVER” can become “NEVER” with little effort in a line of poetry or code. Meaning is so easy to alter.

 This piece is based on four other chunks of code I borrowed from different SFPC students. Upon receiving their code, I smashed them together and reworked it into this graphic. This code has social anxiety. This code doesn’t know who it is anymore.

This piece is based on four other chunks of code I borrowed from different SFPC students. Upon receiving their code, I smashed them together and reworked it into this graphic. This code has social anxiety. This code doesn’t know who it is anymore.

Screen Shot 2018-10-15 at 2.44.28 PM.png
 Computers have really juicy dreams.

Computers have really juicy dreams.

A positive “spin” on daily existence with some help from João Gilberto.

A negative “spin” on existence with some help from a slowed-down João Gilberto.

Using the tools of openFrameworks makes me think about the tools I used to make computer art earlier in my life. Microsoft Paint was essential to my growth as a computational artist. I’ve been feeling nostalgic about it lately. It’s strange and warm and fuzzy how software like Microsoft Paint gets under our skin.

 This is a montage of an image search for “tender” on Shutterstock made with Python. The word “tender” can refer to so many different things; chicken tenders, bartenders, legal tender, or tenderness. Investigating the many different graphic flavors of “tender” can help us to understand the depth, breadth, and associations of  tenderness .

This is a montage of an image search for “tender” on Shutterstock made with Python. The word “tender” can refer to so many different things; chicken tenders, bartenders, legal tender, or tenderness. Investigating the many different graphic flavors of “tender” can help us to understand the depth, breadth, and associations of tenderness.

 Human movement can be modeled in very few points; only 24 in this case. Try moving away from your screen sometimes.

Human movement can be modeled in very few points; only 24 in this case. Try moving away from your screen sometimes.

This is a mosaic self portrait made up of the first 25 ads I was served on Facebook today. The ads are sorted by brightness and matched to the live video environment. Each ad enlarges when you hover over it. 📲 We offer up so much to corporations in exchange for social media accounts. We trade our bodies, identities, and psyches for online presence. I'm concerned about the ways in which we involuntarily change our attitudes and habits based on the ads we see.

 

Hardware Boxes FOr helping others

This tender little "Help Box" is covered in felt, filled with tons of soft things, and emits a green light. Don't be afraid to ask for help. Give your loved ones the green light.

Made with Galen Macdonald, this “Give-a-Penny-Take-A-Penny” box uses logic gates, LEDs, copper pennies, and conductive switches to create “GIVE” or “TAKE” suggestions. If there are no pennies, it says “GIVE”. If there is one penny, it says either “TAKE” or “GIVE”. If there are two pennies, it will only say “TAKE”. This piece is a meditation on generosity and greed. Sometimes it’s important to let people (or yourself) know when it’s time to take vs. when it’s time to give. There are only so many pennies to go around.

C8QZxxqW0AIGate.jpg
 This “support” box uses a simple circuit, a blue LED, and a basic button to let people know when it’s time to give support. Support can be so simple. I’m also interested in blue as the  color for help , as it is also a synonym for sadness. This box was made as a gift for the Support team at  Foursquare .

This “support” box uses a simple circuit, a blue LED, and a basic button to let people know when it’s time to give support. Support can be so simple. I’m also interested in blue as the color for help, as it is also a synonym for sadness. This box was made as a gift for the Support team at Foursquare.

 

A HELP DESK FOR HELP DESKS

 Search for “care” in SMS #1.

Search for “care” in SMS #1.

 Search for “care” in SMS #2.

Search for “care” in SMS #2.

 Search for “care” in SMS #3.

Search for “care” in SMS #3.

This video was made with call center training clips, green screens, and a Macbook Air box. Workers at call centers around the world deal with emotional abuse for hours each day in their often overwhelming, low-paying roles.

This video was made with clips of miners in the Congo, green screens, and a new iPhone box. Miners around the world unearth the mineral coltan, just so you can unbox your new iPhone.

 This code loads, resizes, then layers images of the top 25 tech CEOs of 2018. Something went awry in the code, however, so instead of looking like a composite portrait of an “average” looking top tech CEO (mostly white, male) it looks like a technicolor nightmare—which in the end is pretty appropriate.

This code loads, resizes, then layers images of the top 25 tech CEOs of 2018. Something went awry in the code, however, so instead of looking like a composite portrait of an “average” looking top tech CEO (mostly white, male) it looks like a technicolor nightmare—which in the end is pretty appropriate.

 Business Insider’s Top 25 Tech CEOs of 2018 Glitch

Business Insider’s Top 25 Tech CEOs of 2018 Glitch

 Glitch free: here are Business Insider’s Top 25 Tech CEOs of 2018 all layered together to make this privileged white man monster.

Glitch free: here are Business Insider’s Top 25 Tech CEOs of 2018 all layered together to make this privileged white man monster.

 

This piece is based on a transcript of a customer service chat that an upset Verizon Wireless customer published in an internet forum. I used Python to scan the transcript for every time a person used the word “sorry” in a line. Then, I replaced each instance with the word “GLAD” and “REQUIRED TO SAY”. At the end of the day, call center workers have no choice but to remain composed and scripted in their responses. Still, they are abused and defamed by customers.